Spotlight On Asparagus

Asparagus. It’s one of those grown up foods that took me awhile to get into.

When I say a grown up food I mean I literally started eating it like, a year or so back.

I know. Late to the party but better late than never, right?

There are so many amazing, tasty, and healthy veggies in the world I’m not sure how I almost missed out on this one.

Ok, why should you eat it ?

I can imagine some of you curling your lip at the idea of eating this stalk looking tree type veggie.

Hold up…don’t dismiss it just yet

This giant veggie is one of the most nutritionally well-balanced vegetables — high in folic acid and a good source of potassium, fiber, thiamin, and vitamins, B6, and C. A 5-ounce serving provides 60% of the RDA for folic acid and is low in calories. You can enjoy this veggie raw or with minimal preparation.

The name for asparagus — a member of the lily family — comes from the Greek word meaning “shoot” or “sprout.” Now widely cultivated throughout the world, this regal vegetable is believed to have originated 2,000 years ago in the eastern Mediterranean region, where it was prized for its unique texture and alleged medicinal and aphrodisiacal qualities.

Asparagus spears grow from a crown planted in sandy soils and, under ideal conditions, can grow 10 inches in a 24-hour period. The most common types are green, but you might see two others in supermarkets and restaurants: white, which is more delicate and difficult to harvest, and purple, which is smaller and fruitier.

It could help with your weightloss goals

Asparagus—purple asparagus in particular—is full of anthocyanins, which give fruits and veggies their red, blue, and purple hues and have antioxidant effects that could help your body fight damaging free radicals. When preparing asparagus, try not to either overcook or undercook it. Although cooking the veggie helps activate its cancer-fighting potential, letting it boil or sauté for too long can negate some nutritional benefits. Overcooking asparagus could cause the vitamins to leech out into the water.

It can help with bloating

It can make your urine smell.

I know. Gross 101. It is.

But why??

According to Smithsonian magazine, asparagus is the only food to contain the chemical asparagusic acid. When this aptly named chemical is digested, it breaks down into sulfur-containing compounds, which have a strong, unpleasant scent. They are also volatile, which means that they can vaporize and enter the air and your nose. Asparaguisic acid is not volatile, so asparagus itself doesn’t smell.

What’s weirder than a veggie causing stinky urine is that not everyone can smell it. Scientists aren’t entirely sure why this is. Most evidence seems to suggest that not everyone can smell the odor, though some scientists think that not everyone produces it.

Ok but that really is the least of your worries. Eating Asparagus and all the health benefits it offers far out weighs the unpleasant effect of stinky urine ( this won’t last long)

Let’s eat

My favorite way to eat it is tossed with some olive oil, sea salt and cracked pepper and roasted till tender. I usually throw in garlic cloves and cherry tomatoes too. I add a little fresh parmesan at the end.

It’s amazingly delicious.

You can also grill or steam it. Honestly roasting veggies is my preferred way of eating them. I think it really enhances their flavors.

It’s really, really delicious with bacon wrapped around it ha

Your turn to weigh in. Do you like Asparagus? If so, do you have a preffered way to eat it?

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